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United Kingdom (UK)
A.NATIONAL COMMITTEE
1.

Mr. Tim Fuller
Secretary
The Irrigation and Water Forum ' British National Committee of the
International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage (IWF/ICID.UK)
C/o The Institution of Civil Engineers
One Great George Street
Westminster
London SW1P 3AA

Tel : +44 02 7665 2234
Fax : :+44 02 7799 1325
Email : icid@ice.org.uk, tim.fuller@ice.org.uk
Website : http://www.iwaterforum.org.uk

B.NATIONAL COMMITTEE PRESIDENT / CHAIRMAN
2.

Mr. Simon Howarth
Chairman
The Irrigation and Water Forum ' British National Committee of the
International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage (IWF/ICID.UK)
Mott MacDonald,Demeter House
Station Road, Cambridge CB1 2RS

Tel : +44 (0)1223 463661
Fax : +44 (0)1223 461007
Email : simon.Howarth@mottmac.com

C.ICID OFFICE BEARERS - PRESENT
3.

Mr. Ian William Makin
Vice President, ICID
Theme Leader (Revitalizing Irrigation)
International Water Management Institute (IWMI)
127 Sunil Mawatha
Pelawatte
Battaramulla
SRI LANKA

Tel : +94 11 2880000 Ext: 1336
Mob : +94 770 299 533
Email : ianwmakin@gmail.com, i.makin@cgiar.org

D.ICID OFFICE BEARERS - HONORAIRE
4.

Mr. John Hennessy
President Hon., ICID
1, Bearwood Road
Barkham
WOKINGHAM
BERKSHIRE RG41 4TB

Tel : 0118 978 0157, +44 118 962 7452
Email : johnhennessy12@btinternet.com

5.

Mr. Peter S Lee
President Hon., ICID
Grove House
8 New Market Road
Stretham, Ely, CB6 3JZ, UK

Tel : +44 1353 649417
Email : peterlee.icid@btinternet.com

6.

Dr. Ragab Ragab
Vice President Hon., ICID
Head, Water, Soils and Landscapes
Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH
Maclean Building, Crowmarsh Gifford
Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB

Tel : +44 (0)1491 838800, +44 (0)1491 692303
Mob : :+44-775 368 5447
Fax : +44 (0) 1491 692424
Email : rag@ceh.ac.uk

E.MEMBERS OF ICID COMMITTEES/WORKING GROUPS
7.

Mr. Charles A. Abernethy
c/o IWF/ICID.UK

Email : abernethy@itmin.net, clabernethy@hotmail.com

Member - WG-HIST

8.

Dr. Ragab Ragab
Vice President Hon., ICID
Head, Water, Soils and Landscapes
Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH
Maclean Building, Crowmarsh Gifford
Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB

Chair - WG-WATER & CROP ; Member - WG-PQW, WG-DROUGHT

9.

Mr. Peter S Lee
President Hon., ICID
Address as above

Member - PCTA

10.

Mr. Simon Howarth
Chairman
c/o IWF/ICID.UK
Address as above

Member - EB-JOUR

11.

Mr. Ian William Makin
Vice President, ICID
Theme Leader (Revitalizing Irrigation)
International Water Management Institute (IWMI)
127 Sunil Mawatha
Pelawatte
Battaramulla
SRI LANKA

Tel : +94 11 2880000 Ext: 1336
Mob : +94 770 299 533
Email : ianwmakin@gmail.com, i.makin@cgiar.org

Chair - ERWG, WG-M&R ; Member - PCSO ; Observer - WG-IDM, WG-WATS

12.

Mr. Simon Howarth
c/o International Commission on Irrigation
and Drainage (IWF/ICID.UK)

Email : simon.Howarth@mottmac.com

Member - EB-JOUR

13.

Mr. Alan Kendall Clark
Principal
Northwest Hydraulic Consultants (NHC)
77B Estcourt Road
Salisbury, Wiltshire, SP1 3AX

Tel : +44 (0)1722 421689
Mob : +44 07790041055
Email : aclark@nhcweb.com

Member - WG-M&R

14.

Mr. Philip J. Riddell
Irrigation/Water Resources Policy and Management Adviser
303 Route D'Avouzon
01170 Crozet, France
FRANCE

Tel : +33-(0)450-992884
Mob : +44 –(0)7539 533 4
Email : philriddell@hotmail.com, phil.riddell@ia2c.org

Member - WG-IOA

15.

Dr. Guy Jobbins
Research Fellow
Overseas Development Institute
203 Blackfriars Road, London, SE1 8NJ

Tel : 07786 471325
Email : g.jobbins@odi.org.uk

Member - WG-CLIMATE

16.

Mr. Oliver Taylor
Water Resources Consultant

Tel : +44 (0)1244 319413
Mob : +44 (0)797 778 2345
Email : olivercctaylor@live.co.uk

Provisional Member - C-PR&P

Links of Interest

ICID Strategy for Implementing Sector Vision - Water for Food and Rural Development and Country Position Papers, 2000

Directory Contents..

COUNTRY PROFILE - UNITED KINGDOM (UK)


1. Geography and Geology

 

The United Kingdom of Great Britain comprises England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. It lies on the western edge of Europe and is surrounded by sea. No part of the country is more than 120 km from tidal waters. The total area of the United Kingdom is 24.1 million ha. Great Britain can be divided roughly into two main areas - lowland Britain and highland Britain. In the former, the midlands, southern and eastern England lies the new and softer rocks. The hillier areas, in Scotland, most of Wales, the broad central uplands known as the Pennines, and the Lake District consist mainly of outcrops of very old rocks. Lowland Britain and most of Northern Ireland is less than 300 m above sea level. The younger rocks in this area break down more easily into soil; and so the greater part of lowland Britain comprises cultivated and settled areas, with varying textured soils from clay to sandy loam silt and peat. The soils on the hills are poor and thin, supporting coarse grasses, bracken, heather or trees.

 

2. Climate and Rainfall

 

The climate of Great Britain is temperate and equitable. The prevailing winds are south- westerly and the climate is largely determined by that of the eastern Atlantic, although during the winter months easterly winds may bring a cold, dry, continental type of weather. The average range of temperature between winter and summer varies from 7' to 12'C, being highest inland in the eastern part of England.

 

During a normal summer the temperature occasionally rises above 27'C; winter temperatures below -7'C are rare. Sunshine decreases from north to south. The average summer (April - September) potential evapotranspiration ranges from about 230 mm in the Scottish highlands to 500 mm in East Anglia.

 

The average annual rainfall over Great Britain is about 1,080 mm, ranging from over 4,000 mm in a few points in the hills of Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland to 500 mm in parts of East Anglia.

 

3. Population and Land Use

 

The population of Great Britain is about 56 million, giving an average population density of about 230 inhabitants/sq.km with over 80% of the people living in towns.

 

For many centuries most of the land in Britain lay in estates ranging in size from a few hundred hectares upwards, comprising farms of varying sizes let out to tenants. Due to social change and heavy estate duties, farms were sold and many were bought by the tenants. About half the farms in Great Britain today are owner occupied. However, the trend nowadays is towards merging into larger units, particularly for arable farming.

 

Of the total area of Great Britain of 24 million ha, about 7 million ha is arable land, 11 million ha. is permanent grassland, 2 million ha is forested land and the remaining 4 million ha, is either built on or wasteland.

 

4. Water Resources and Irrigation

 

River water quality has improved over the last few decades as a result of improvements to effluent quality, particularly from sewage treatment works run by the private water companies under the guidance of the Environment Agency. The quality of most rivers is now adequate for use for irrigation and attention is now being given to the control of diffuse sources of pollution, particularly from the use of pesticides and fertilizers on fields. Control of such pollutants is essential to ensure that groundwater resources are not polluted.

 

All irrigation is carried out on an individual farm basis; there are no area or district schemes organised by public authorities. Some 90% of outside irrigation is spray. Trickle systems are used to a greater extent under glass and are becoming more popular for certain outside fruit crops where there is little cultivation and the pipes can remain in place for some years.

 

The quantity of water licensed for abstraction in England and Wales for spray irrigation in 1995 was 289 million m3 (approximately 45% direct from surface, 40% from groundwater and 15% from surface water via reservoirs). In addition to this some 3% of the total demand for irrigation was taken from the public mains. Spray irrigation in England and Wales is concentrated in East Anglia, parts of the Trent Valley in the Midlands and the Somerset levels, and in the Wye Valleys.

The area of crops irrigated in Scotland and Northern Ireland is very small and not included in the statistics.

 

Across England and Wales in an average year only 2% of the total water abstracted is used for spray irrigation and agriculture, compared to 51 % for public supply. However, in East Anglia, where spray irrigation is concentrated, the proportion is higher and on a warm summer day the amount taken for spray irrigation can exceed that taken directly from rivers and boreholes for public water supply.

 

Demand for irrigation is forecast to increase substantially, particularly if climate change leads to warmer and drier summers. Much of the demand is driven by supermarkets seeking good quality vegetables and fruit. Reliable irrigation will improve the appearance and yield of crops and reduce the need for chemicals. Vegetable production is now an international business with British farmers competing with European and other countries without the benefit of subsidies and supports provided to cereal producers.

 

5. Institutional Arrangements

 

England and Wales

 

The Environment Agency was set up by the British Government in 1997 to 'protect and improve the environment for current and future generations'. Amongst other responsibilities it is the licensing authority for water abstraction and has powers to protect people and property in low lying areas from flooding.

 

The Agency has a statutory duty to secure the proper use of water resources, which includes;

  • assessing the need for new developments and licenses;
  • ensuring that the most appropriate schemes are licensed, taking into account the environmental impact of new developments and the impact on existing users.

The Agency owns and operates a few raw water transfer and environmental support schemes. The financing, promotion and development of new schemes will normally be the concern of the main beneficiaries. The initiative for developing schemes rests with the water companies or other private sector investors. The Government and Environment Agency do not give grants for irrigation schemes.

 

Farmers who wish to irrigate using spray equipment must have a licence from the Environment Agency. At present, trickle irrigation is not licensable, although the Government plans to introduce legislation to bring it under control.

In some areas the Agency is not issuing any further summer surface water or groundwater abstraction licences because the limited resources are already committed to other users and/or the ecological requirements of streams and wetlands. In these areas expansion of irrigation can only be by abstracting winter water flows for storage in a reservoir for use in the irrigation season.

 

Many of the most productive agricultural areas lie in flood plains. Major drainage systems, often managed by Internal Drainage Boards, support local field drainage. The Environment Agency is responsible for the 'main' rivers and sea defences, and work with financial support from the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and local authorities to maintain defence standards. In recent years there has been greater emphasis on protecting urban areas from flooding and protection of agricultural land is a lower priority.

 

The Agency&&146;s Shoreline Management Plans are an example of the strategic approach to sea defences it is taking. It is working with the natural geomorphological processes, including where appropriate adopting &&145;managed retreat&&146; options.

 

Great Britain and ICID

 

British National Committee of ICID (ICID.UK) joined ICID in 1951, and has since been actively associated with ICID activities at national as well as international level. British National Committee hosted the 22nd IEC at London in 1971; 31st IEC at London in 1980; 48th IEC at Oxford in 1997. British National Committee is actively represented in 18 ICID workbodies. Mr. E.A. G. Johnson (1958-1961); Mr. P.A. Scott (1969-1972); Mr. W.R. Rangeley (1975-1978); Mr. John Hennessy (1986-1989); Mr. Peter S. Lee (1997-2000); Dr. Ragab Ragab (2010-2013) were the Vice Presidents of ICID. Mr. W.R. Rangeley (1981-1984), Mr. John Hennessy (1990-1993) and Mr. Peter S. Lee (2005-2008) were the Presidents of ICID.

 

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